HIP HOP 50: And they thought it wouldn’t last!

the DOC
Called a film about redemption, The DOC, featuring Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Dr. Dre, Erykah Badu and others, chronicles his life because he has an impressive portfolio D.O.C. has an extensive resume including his platinum selling debut album, No One Can Do It Better, writing lyrics for N.W.A’s Straight Outta Compton, Eazy-E’s Eazy-Duz-It, and Dr. Dre’s The Chronic. It, and Dr. Dre’s The Chronic.
Photo: Courtesy

Who knew that the “noise” taking over the streets, recreation centers, house parties, college campuses and clubs would turn into a multi-billion dollar industry and still be thriving 50 years later?

Almost two decades ago, ABC News reported that Hip Hop “generates more than $10 billion per year.”

Salt-N-Pepa
Salt-N-Pepa

Could this be from sales to just Urban youth? Not at all. Hip Hop also shattered color and language barriers, which probably led to even more criticism; while corporate America continued to ride the culture to the bank.

Just think about what those numbers have morphed into today, making billionaires out of not only corporate execs, but artists/entertainers/ entrepreneurs too!

“Why White Kids Love Hip Hop: Wangstas, Wiggers, Wannabes, and the New Reality of Race in America,” and “The Hip Hop Generation,” are two books by culture critic Bakari Kit-wana who discusses the popularity of Hip Hop, also among young white Americans.

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Numerous reports place numbers be- tween 70 and 80 percent of hip-hop’s consumers (music purchasers) as sub-urban, middle-class Whites.

The genre’s highly publicized “beefs,” notably between the East and West Coast rappers, didn’t help its image, although some supporters said the disagreements were contrived, deliberately orchestrated to sell records.

James Brown
James Brown

So , it looks like Hip Hop is not going anywhere, and it doesn’t hurt when you have James Brown, as one of the most sampled artists in Hip Hop, meaning music from the Godfather of Soul and the JBs can be heard in almost 10,000 songs, according to several music sites.

Today, there are numerous award programs, museums, and buildings named in honor of Hip Hop icons; as well as songs appearing in the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress.

This isn’t just music, tapes, CDs, DVDs, videos or even records. The industry has exploded to include movies, clothing lines, advertising campaigns, beauty and hair products; and it doesn’t stop there.

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“Do you love Black people? If you don’t love Black people, you don’t love rap,”

-Chuck D

Public Enemy’s Chuck D. understands why the initial assumption that rap – the fast-paced, upbeat music that popped onto the scene in 1973 and sparked a revolution that gave voice and purpose to urban youth globally – was merely temporary.

Song after song emerged, there were MC battles and then “Rapper’s Delight,” the Sugar-hill Gang peaked at 40 in the U.S. and made it to other charts, hitting “mainstream America.”

Chuck (Carlton Douglass Ridenhour), who hails from Long Island, said the landscape in the boroughs of New York provided the base for a genre that is worldwide today.

Journalist Danielle Sanders lauds rappers for making beats on their own – without formal classes or training – but with an entrepreneurial spirit.

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“Look at where it was birthed: Out of a reduction in funding of arts programs,” Sanders said. “Those kids, the ingenuity of these young people, in spite of economics, created a culture.”

Whether they were using their hands, mouths or feet to make music – or taking advantage of their parent’s vinyl records – young boys and girls creatively brought their experiences into the mainstream, where their music eventually dominated.

Familiar names like DJ Kool Herc, Grand Master Flash, The Last Poets and Afrika Bam-baataa, all emerged from the Bronx and were Hip Hop’s fore-runners.

They opened doors and ushered in a culture that has trans- formed generations. Eric B. of the popular Hip Hop duo Eric B, and Rakim, who got their starts in the “icy 80s,” said he realized how large and influential rap music had become while watching television seeing the proliferation of rap hits in commercials.

Public Enemy and Run DMC

As a young man growing up in New York, Eric worked at WBLS-FM Radio with the legendary Frankie Crocker. He loved music and enjoyed working first as Crocker’s assistant before moving on to the street team and then to deejaying.

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Rapping felt good, he said, when he entered the arena.

Now, 35 years later, he says he is still feeling good. “I’m in awe of it. I’m having a good time. We love doing it so much we’d do it for free!”

When Eric talks about his entrance into the industry and his becoming part of the premiere DJ/MC team in Hip Hop, his story sounds familiar: It is similar to that of others who started out young and still are touring and providing opportunities for other younger artists.

“That was our way out of the inner-city,” he explained. “We took absolutely nothing and turned it into something.”

That “nothing” Eric refers to is what sparked rapper, writer and producer, The D.O.C. to enter industry.

Often celebrated for his de- livery and strong writing skills, D.O.C. (born Tracy Lynn Curry) is heralded as Dallas Royalty.

The D.O.C. later survived a car crash shortly after the release of one of his most popular songs. That accident changed his life because his larynx was crushed, damaging his vocal cords. He now spends much of his time working on projects and mentoring aspiring artists.

Afrika Bambaataa and Ice T
Afrika Bambaataa and Ice T

Growing up in the “hood” he always wanted to do something with his life and becoming part of the Fila Fresh Crew offered him the opportunity.

He left home for the West Coast where he joined with others and formed the chart-topping group, NWA.

D.O.C. later survived a car crash. That accident changed his life because his larynx was crushed, damaging his vocal cords. He now spends much of his time working on projects and mentoring aspiring artists.

There’s also the documentary that pre-miered at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2022. Called a film about redemption, The DOC, featuring Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Dr. Dre, Erykah Badu and others, chronicles his life because he has an impressive portfolio D.O.C. has an extensive resume including his platinum selling debut album, No One Can Do It Better, writing lyrics for N.W.A’s Straight Outta Compton, Eazy-E’s Eazy-Duz-It, and Dr. Dre’s The Chronic.

He also started a buzz amongst his many fans when they heard that he was going back into the studio. After all, this man was responsible for writing some of NWA’s hits and had just released his own hit, around the time of the accident.

His fans haven’t forgotten him and like so many other “old-school” rappers he’s spending his time cultivating young talent and sharing his talents back home in Dallas.

Some, like Chuck, still tour. He also writes, does more than dabble in art, lectures and is the brains behind RapStation Radio, which bills itself as the “oldest and purest Hip Hop radio network in the world.”

Arabian Prince has spent the past 30 years working in the tech space with animation and teaching young boys and girls interested in technology. It gives them something to do, something to keep them off the streets.

It’s what rap music did for him, the Arabian Prince said.

It wasn’t just the music, said Chuck, who is known for pricking the consciousness of society with an analysis of the world and people. It’s also the music, deejays, graffiti and dances, and that almighty “word” is so important.

“The ‘word’,” he said. “You can start and stop things with words. It’s important to have knowledge of language and words.”

Any discussion about Hip Hop should include Carolivia Herron. A professor and atypical image of a hip-hop aficionado, Herron saw the greatness of the music and brought it into her classrooms at Harvard and Howard universities. She also brought the artists, including Chuck D and Newark’s Queen Latifah, into her academic settings.

Herron, a self-proclaimed “literature person” who reads mostly ancient European literature, said she considers Hip Hop to have an “it” factor.

From the first time she heard rap, she recognized it as a new form of communication and she coined it as the next “thing.”

Herron remained steadfast to that narrative, despite the negative assaults that eventually came when the music, clothes, graffiti, language and dance styles were targeted.

First, critics deemed the language “juvenile” and not worthy of attention.

You also have premiere women’s groups from back in the day, like TLC, Salt-N-Pepa, JJ Fad, and Sequence. These ladies had heavy tour schedules just like the men.

Later, a highly orchestrated campaign erupted.

Then-Vice President Al Gore’s wife, Tipper, police unions, the National Political Congress of Black Women and others condemned rap as “pornographic” and “gangsta.”

Other critics blasted the genre, with its supporting cast of scantily-clad dancers and cuss words, as misogynistic.

Yo-Yo, MC Lyte, Brandy and Queen Latifah

The genre’s highly publicized “beefs,” notably between the East and West Coast rappers, didn’t help its image, although some supporters said the dis-agreements were contrived, deliberately orchestrated to sell records.

Chuck acknowledged the music’s scene, at the time, wasn’t an ideal sight to behold. Sadly, he said, many artists lost their lives or loved ones to drugs, violence, alcoholism, or unhealthy lifestyles.

Still, rap had its plethora of supporters.

Ice T, NWA and Public Enemy claimed the music spoke to the unique realities in their com- munities: Police brutality in urban communities across America, slow responses of police to their calls and a disrespectful treatment toward Black men.

Hip Hop also has no shortage of women, then and now.

MC Hammer
MC Hammer

Early on some of the most prolific voices were MC Lyte, Roxanne Shante, Lil Kim, Eve, and Queen Latifah; leading into today with the likes of Megan Thee Stallion, Cardi B, and Nicki Minaj.

You also have premiere women’s groups from back in the day, like TLC, Salt-N-Pepa, JJ Fad, and Sequence. These ladies had heavy tour schedules just like the men. Women showed up through- out the industry: Some were producers, promoters, stylists or dancers.

In 2021, U.S. Congress declared November as National Hip Hop History Month. The bill was sponsored by Black America’s favorite “Auntie,” U. S. Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-CA), Congressman Jamaal Bowman (D-NY) and Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) referenced Hip Hop’s lasting influence on American Culture.

Women continue to make their presence in the industry felt today. D/FW is also home to Spinderella (Deidra Muriel Roper), who many got to know as the woman on the Wheels of Steel (turntables) as part of Salt- N-Pepa.

While she is no longer with the group, her star is still shining and she is a definite crowd pleaser. She reunited with the group last year as they received their star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

And let’s take things way back to Kool Herc’s sister, Cindy Campbell, who was his promoter.

She remembers August 11, 1973 – the birth date of Hip Hop, because it was at her back to school party that she planned and promoted, that this new genre made its debut.

Erykah Badu and Janelle Monae
Erykah Badu and Janelle Monae

It was a special time, she said, and many artists lived in the moment, not realizing or concerned about the future. They simply spoke of their realities and of their conditions: It was life through their own lenses.

And it took almost 40 years for another form of legitimacy, other than in the streets or at the cash register.

In 2021, U.S. Congress declared November as National Hip Hop History Month.

The bill was sponsored by Black America’s favorite “Auntie,” U. S. Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-CA), Congressman Jamaal Bowman (D- NY) and Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) referenced Hip Hop’s lasting influence on American Culture.

The politicians, ironically from the two coasts, had joined together to recognize the significance of an art form once criticized and, some supporters believe, even demonized by the White House and many influential Black women in the country.

Hip Hop is now a multi-billion-dollar industry that has artists listed as some of the richest people in the world So entrenched is the music into society that rap music is being used to sell everything from cars to tacos and from water to vacations. Some commercials, ironically, feature all-white casts.

Additionally, rap artists are some of the highest paid actors; some have transitioned from the small screen to the big screen and, even, to Broadway.

Missy Elliott

A trip around the globe will yield music lovers who don’t speak fluent English, yet they spout the lyrics of English-speaking rappers.

Steven Samuels reports and documents hip hop culture. A former rapper, he launched one of the number one hip hop sites, SOHH.com. He knows the science of Hip Hop and remembers when “Bronx was on fire.”

“People were dis- placed, but we still made do,” he said, adding that Hip Hop music is technical, taking two turntables and doing something different and it’s fluid enough to transfer into newer places.

“It’s the creative stories, word play, socially conscious, parties and gangster rap,” Sanders said. “That’s Hip Hop.”

Chuck added: Hip Hop is nothing without Black People.

Whodini

As he geared up for the 50th Celebrations, which included numerous concerts, interviews and tributes that supporters said are long overdue and definitely worthy, Chuck agreed.

One thing’s for sure, Hip Hop originated with Black people, and you add in the Caribbean flavor from the very beginning and we’re talking about 50 years of great art and culture.

Chuck sums it all up for those who profess to love rap music.

He asks, “Do you love Black people? If you don’t love Black people, you don’t love rap!”

Art of Tupac in Rio Janeiro

Hip Hop 50th Anniversary Texas Metro News Play List

Roxanne Shante and Slick Rick.

6-1-23 Eminem: “Lose Yourself”
6-2-23 M.O.P.: “Ante Up”
6-3-23 Queen Latifah: “U.N.I.T.Y.”
6-4-23 Wiz Khalifa – See You Again ft. Charlie Puth
6-5-23 DJ Kool – Let Me Clear My Throat
6-6-23 Fat Joe- Lean Back
6-7-23 MC Lyte- Lyte As A Rock
6-8-23 DJ Khaled, Trick Daddy, Pitbull, Rick Ross – Born N Raised
6-9-23 Ice Cube – AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted
6-10-23 Kool Moe Dee – How Ya Like Me Now
6-11-23 HIP-HOP 50 Medley Part 1 | 2023 GRAMMYs
6-12-23 The Roots – Things Fall Apart
6-13-23 The Notorious B.I.G. – I Got A Story To Tell
6-14-23 Killer Mike – Don’t Let The Devil
6-15-23 Drake – Hotline Bling
6-16-23 The Notorious B.I.G. – Sky is the Limit
6-17-23 Drake – Fireworks
6-18-23 50 Cent: “Many Men”
6-19-23 Missy Elliott – Work It
6-20-23 Chief Keef (feat. Lil Reese): “I Don’t Like”
6-21-23 Eve – Who’s That Girl?
6-22-23 Prodigy – Keep It Thoro
6-23-23 Creepin on Ah Come Up – Bone Thugs
6-24-23 Missy Elliott – You Don’t Know
6-25-23 Crush on You (feat. Lil’ Cease) – Lil Kim
6-26-23 Cardi B – Up
6-27-23 Fugees – Ready or Not
6-28-23 DJ Kool ft. Biz Markie & Doug E. Fresh – Let Me Clear My Throat
6-29-23 Eric B & Rakim – Move the Crowd
6-30-23 Nelly – Country Grammar
7-1-23 Nas – If I Ruled the World (Imagine That) ft. Lauryn Hill
7-2-23 SZA – Snooze
7-3-23 Ja Rule – Put It On Me (Official Music Video) ft. Vita, Lil’ Mo
7-4-23 Beyoncé Remix – Crazy In Love, Run The World, Diva, Everybody Mad (Dance Video)
7-5-23 Joyner Lucas – Broski “Official Video” (Not Now I’m Busy)
7-6-23 Hip-Hop 50 Medley Part 3 | 2023 GRAMMYs
7-7-23 Public Enemy – Don’t Believe The Hype
7-8-23 Brandy, Erykah Badu, Teyana Taylor & H.E.R. Represent In Their 2020 Cypher
7-9-23 D’Angelo – Brown Sugar
7-10-23 Jermaine Dupri – Welcome to Atlanta ft. Ludacris
7-11-23 Nicki Minaj – Your Love
7-12-23 Kid Capri, MC Lyte, Big Daddy Kane & More Bring 80s Hip-Hop Front & Center
7-13-23 Megan Thee Stallion Stalli Freestyle
7-14-23 Ice Spice & Nicki Minaj – Princess Diana
7-15-23 Dr Dre – Nuthin’ But A “G” Thang
7-16-23 Watch The Throne (Kanye West & Jay-Z)
7-17-23 Queen Latifah – Ladies First
7-18-23 Saweetie – My Type
7-19-23 Cold Rock a Party (feat. Missy Misdemeanor Elliott)
7-20-23 Megan Thee Stallion – Plan B
7-21-23 Dr. Dre – Still D.R.E.
7-22-23 Gang Starr – Mass Appeal
7-23-23 The Sugarhill Gang – 8th Wonder
7-24-23 Lil’ Kim – Crush On You
7-25-23 Nas – If I Ruled the World
7-26-23 Charli Baltimore – Stand Up
7-27-23 MC Trouble – (I Wanna) Make You Mine
7-28-23 Eve – Who’s That Girl?
7-29-23 Missy Elliott – Gossip Folks
7-30-23 Mary J. Blige – Family Affair
7-31-23 Lil’ Kim ft. Lil’ Cease – Crush On You
8-1-23 Puff Daddy – No Way Out
8-2-23 Big Pokey – Sensei feat. Ronnetta Spencer
8-3-23 Ice Cube – It Was A Good Day
8-4-23 Foxy Brown – Hot Spot
8-5-23 Salt-N-Pepa – Shake Your Thang
8-6-23 Nas – If I Ruled the World MSGT Joe Bridgewater (posthumous) Nelline Bridgewater
8-7-23 Roxanne Shanté – Big Mama
8-8-23 Queen Latifah – Wrath of My Madness
8-9-23 Trina – Look Back At Me
8-10-23 The Lady Of Rage – Afro Puffs
8-11-23 GRAVEDIGGAZ – 6′ Feet Deep
8-12-23 Outkast – Hey Ya!
8-13-23 Nicki Minaj – Your Love
8-14-23 Brandy, Erykah Badu, Teyana Taylor & H.E.R. | Hip Hop Awards 20
8-15-23 Public Enemy – Fight The Power
8-16-23 The Notorious B.I.G. – Hypnotize
8-17-23 Roxanne Shante – Have a nice day
8-18-23 I’m Leavin’ U (Gotta Go, Gotta Go) – MC Lyte
8-19-23 Ludacris – What’s Your Fantasy ft. Shawnna
8-20-23 GloRilla: “F.N.F.”
8-21-23 Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five – The Message
8-22-23 Jermaine Dupri – Welcome To Atlanta ft. Ludacris
8-23-23 Tupac – California Love
8-24-23 Classic Hits | Hip Hop Awards ’22
8-25-23 Coke Le Roc
8-26-23 Remy Ma – Wake Me Up ft. Lil’ Kim
8-27-23 Ja Rule – Always On Time
8-28-23 Run DMC – Its Like That
8-29-23 The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill
8-30-23 Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five – The Message
8-31-23 MC HAMMER – LET’S GET IT STARTED with TROOP SUIT!
9-1-23 Ice Tea- Reckless (feat. The Glove, Dave Storrs)
9-2-23 Watch the HIP-HOP 50 Medley Part 1 | 2023 GRAMMYs
9-3-23 Kurtis Blow-The Breaks
9-4-23 Ladies Night – Lil Kim, Da Brat Missy Elliot
9-5-23 Fat Joe Featuring P Diddy- Don Cartagena
9-6-23 Fancy – Da Brat
9-7-23 Jay-Z – Dirt Off Your Shoulder
9-8-23 I Come Off – Young MC
9-9-23 Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes – The Block Party
9-10-23 The Notorious B.I.G. – Big Poppa
9-11-23 Monie Love – Monie in the Middle
9-12-23 Cardi B – Bongos (feat. Megan Thee Stallion)
9-13-23 Fabolous – Keepin’ It Gangsta
9-14-23 Gangsta Boo – Love Don’t Live
9-15-23 Public Enemy – Shut ‘Em Down
9-16-23 Big Daddy Kane – Ain’t No Half-Steppin’
9-17-23 Yo Yo – Mama Don’t Take No Mess
9-18-23 Biggie Smalls – Who Shot Ya?
9-19-23 Fear Not Of Man – Mos Def
9-20-23 By Wu Tang Clan –“C.R.E.A.M.”
9-21-23 “Ruff Ryders’ Anthem” DMX
9-22-23 Heart Of The City (Ain’t No Love) Jay- Z
9-23-23 “Crush On You” (Remix) – Lil’ Kim feat. Lil’ Cease 
9-24-23 “I’ll Be” – Foxy Brown
9-25-23 “Award Tour” A Tribe Called Quest
9-26-23 N.Y. State of Mind – Nas
9-27-23 “The Message” Grandmaster – Flash and the Furious Five
9-28-23 “It’s All About the Benjamins” – Diddy feat. The Notorious B.I.G., Lil’ Kim, and The Lox
9-29-23 “Hey Ma” – Cam’ron feat. Juelz Santana
9-30-23 “Lean Back” Terror Squad feat. Fat Joe and Remy Ma
10-1-23 “Ms. Fat Booty” – Mos Def
10-2-23 “Flava In Ya Ear” Craig Mack
10-3-23 “Paid in Full” – Eric B and Rakim
10-4-23 “New York” – Ja Rule feat. Fat Joe and Jadakiss
10-5-23 “Money, Power, Respect” – The Lox feat. DMX and Lil’ Kim
10-6-23 “In Da Club” – 50 Cent
10-7-23 “We Fly High” – Jim Jones
10-8-23 “Dipset Anthem” – The Diplomats
10-9-23 “Get By” – Talib Kweli
10-10-23 “Put Your Hands Where My Eyes Can See” – Busta Rhymes
10-11-23 I’ll Be Missing You – Puff Daddy feat. Faith Evans & 112
10-12-23 Meet Joe Black – Nas
10-13-23 So Fresh, So Clean – OutKast
10-14-23 “Still Not A Player” – Big Pun feat. Joe
10-15-23 “Roxanne’s Revenge” – Roxanne Shanté
10-16-23 No Time – Lil Kim
10-17-23 “Paid In Full” – Eric B & Rakim
10-18-23 “In My Trunk” – Bun B ft. Young Dolph, Maxo Kream
10-19-23 Fear Not Of Man – Mos Def
10-20-23 Miracles – KB, Lecrae
10-21-23 Who Am I (What’s My Name)? – Snoop Dogg
10-22-23 Work It – Missy Elliott
10-23-23 “Crossroads” – Bone Thugs-N-Harmony
10-24-23  Rare freestyle – Tupac And Notorious B.I.G
10-25-23 Back That Thang Up – Juvenile ft. Mannie Fresh, Lil Wayne
10-26-23 “Rough Riders’ Anthem” – DMX
10-27-23 Sorry not Sorry – Omeretta
10-28-23 “Doo-Wop (That Thing)” – Lauryn Hill
10-29-23 Hip Hop Hooray – Naughty by Nature
10-30-23 “Gangsta’s Paradise” – Coolio
10-31-23 Welcome To Atlanta ft. Ludacris – Jermaine Dupri
11-1-23 Run This Town ft. Rihanna, Kanye West – Jay-Z
11-2-23 Push It – Salt-N-Pepa
11-3-23 Empire State of Mind LIVE – Jay Z & Alicia Keys
11-4-23 Summertime  – DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince
11-5-23 “F**k The Police” – N.W.A.
11-6-23 “Get Ur Freak On” – Missy Elliott
11-7-23 California Love – 2Pac ft. Dr. Dre 
11-8-23 Mr. DJ – Joyce Irby Feat. Doug E. Fresh
11-9-23 “Never Scared” – Bone Crusher feat. Killer Mike & T.I.
11-10-23 “It’s Tricky”  –  Run-DMC
11-11-23 Taste of Chocolate – Big Daddy Kane
11-12-23 South Bronx – Boogie Down Productions 
11-13-23 The Bridge – MC Shan
11-14-23 Gettin’ Giggy Wit It – Will Smith
11-15-23  “Who’s That Girl?” –  Eve
11-16-23 “A Milli” – Lil Wayne
11-17-23 Kanye West: “POWER”
11-18-23 “Shook Ones Pt. II” – Mobb Deep
11-19-23 “I Got 5 On It” – Luniz
11-20-23 “Jump Around” – House of Pain
11-21-23 THE MAIN INGREDIENT’ – PETE ROCK & CL SMOOTH
11-22-23 Ruff Ryders’ Anthem – DMX
11-23-23 Straight out the Jungle – Jungle Brothers
11-24- 23 “Raise Up” – Petey Pablo
11-25-23 Black and yellow  –  Wiz Khalifa
11-26-23 Crush On You  –  Lil’ Kim ft. Lil’ Cease
11-27-23 Anaconda  –  Nicki Minaj
11-28-23 “Mo Bamba” – Sheck Wes
11-29-23 Lean Back – Terror Squad Ft. Fat Joe & Remy Ma
11-30-23 Welcome To The Party – Pop Smoke
12-1-23 What’s The 411? – MARY J. BLIGE
12-2-23 Hollow Bones – Wu Tang Clan
12-3-23 “O.P.P.” – Naughty By Nature
12-4-23 “In Da Club” – 50 Cent
12-5-23 “Mo Bamba” – Sheck Wes
12-6-23 Presha – 2 Chainz, Lil Wayne
12-7-23 Dreams And Nightmares – Meek Mill
12-8-23 A King and Queen Creation  –  Queen Latifah
12-9-23 The Message – Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five
12-10-23 “Swag Surfin” – F.L.Y. (Fast Life Yungstaz)
12-11-23 Int’l Players Anthem – UGK (Underground Kingz) Feat. Outkast
12-12-23 The Rain (Supa Dupa Fly) – Missy “Misdemeanor” Elliott
12-13-23 Paper Thin – MC Lyte
12-14-23 The World Is Yours  –  Nas
12-15-23 Winter Warz  –  Wu-Tang Clan
12-16-23 CANCEL CHRISTMAS (feat. *NSYNC) – Drake
12-17-23 All For One – Brand Nubian 
12-18-23 Nellyville  –  Nelly
12-19-23 Christmas in Hollis’  – Queen Latifah and D.M.C
12-20-23 Christmas Rappin’  –  Kurtis Blow
12-21-23 HOLIDAY  –  Lil Nas X
12-22-23 “Let It Snow” – Jewel and Queen Latifah
12-23-23 Chris Brown – This Christmas
12-24-23 GRINCH GOES VIRAL  –  Dax
12-25-23 Christmas In Hollis  –  RUN DMC
12-26-23 Queen Of Royal Badness  –  Queen Latifah
12-27-23 FTCU  –  Nicki Minaj
12-28-23 Knuck If You Buck  –  Crime Mob 
12-29-23 Kendrick Lamar: “Alright”
12-30-23 Dead Prez: “Hip-Hop”
12-31-23 Public Enemy – Welcome to the Terrordome

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